Tag Archives: mindfulness

Attached to Your Practice—Or Just Disciplined?

The Sacred Cow Blog

By Karen Macklin on July 16th, 2011


We practice yoga and meditation for many reasons, one of which is to let go of our attachments to emotions, relationships, and habitual patterns and addictions. But what if we start to develop an attachment to our practice? And how do we know if it’s an attachment—or if it’s discipline?

Read More on Pranamaya’s The Sacred Cow Blog »»

Jon Kabat-Zinn: Coming to Our Senses

While looking online for some information on Mindfulness Meditation, I came across the video of a wonderful 2005 lecture by Jon Kabat-Zinn that I wanted to share.

Renowned mindfulness meditation teacher and best-selling author Jon Kabat-Zinn speaks at UCSD Medical Center in 2005 on the topic of “Coming to Our Senses”, which is also the name of his book, subtitled “Healing Ourselves and the World Through Mindfulness”. A pioneer in the application of ancient Buddhist practices to healing in modern medical settings, Kabat-Zinn expounds upon the value of “resting in awareness” not only to facilitate clarity in ourselves, but also as a means of relating to and healing the “dis-ease” in politics, society and the world.

First Aired on UCSD Television: 4/28/2005

Is Yoga Hindu?

The question comes up regularly – in classes and in the media. Is yoga a religion? Is yoga Hindu?

Swami Nirmalananda, the founder of Svaroopa® yoga, recently posted a blog entry which may help answer that question.

“… there’s a lot of difference between Hinduism and yoga, which is completely dependent on your purpose:  if you are practicing it (yoga or Hinduism) for the purpose of being prettier, younger, stronger, healthier, happier, wealthier, smarter, etc – it’s religion, or worse – just another way of trying to manipulate your body and your life.  If you are practicing it (yoga or Hinduism) for the purpose of knowing Truth / God / Reality within yourself, it’s yoga.”

“… at the same time there is very little difference between yoga and Hinduism.  They use common terminology (Sanskrit terms), are based in shared texts, are looking at the same realities, and have the same foundational understanding…”

Read Swamiji’s complete commentary on the Svaroopa® Vidya Ashram blog»