Tag Archives: mental sharpness

Aging Well – Barbara G.

Aging Well – Barbara G.

Barbara G.

Barbara, one of my students, passed away a few weeks ago after a brief illness at age 88. I only knew her from exercise classes and as a gifted painter.  But others told me about the rest of her amazing life.

Barbara was a veteran of WWII having served as a Sergeant in the US Marine Corps in their MAPS Division.

She was Chief technical illustrator for the Marine Technology Section of a major consulting company where among other projects she was involved in project TRIDENT for the U.S. Navy where she was responsible for all illustrations for technological reports which included antisubmarine warfare, sonar technology, and oceanography. She was also involved with illustrations for the Lunar drill used during the Apollo moon landing.

Jon Kabat-Zinn: Coming to Our Senses

While looking online for some information on Mindfulness Meditation, I came across the video of a wonderful 2005 lecture by Jon Kabat-Zinn that I wanted to share.

Renowned mindfulness meditation teacher and best-selling author Jon Kabat-Zinn speaks at UCSD Medical Center in 2005 on the topic of “Coming to Our Senses”, which is also the name of his book, subtitled “Healing Ourselves and the World Through Mindfulness”. A pioneer in the application of ancient Buddhist practices to healing in modern medical settings, Kabat-Zinn expounds upon the value of “resting in awareness” not only to facilitate clarity in ourselves, but also as a means of relating to and healing the “dis-ease” in politics, society and the world.

First Aired on UCSD Television: 4/28/2005

Poses and Pauses

According to Yoga Journal  Mentor Maty Ezraty, “Transitions from pose to pose are often neglected in yoga classes. Students tend to rush, forgetting to take time to get in and out of postures…. It is also in the transitions, or the pauses, that we can learn the most about yoga. These pauses create times to reflect and consider the effect of each pose. This is one reason why your teachers have you pause before coming up from Savasana. Staying in touch with the calm and focus of a deep Savasana is much easier if you do not jump out of the pose. Take time to stay with that feeling of relaxation as you slowly pause on the way back to “normal” life. This is the real yoga – bringing your experience from the mat into the rest of your life.”

http://www.yogajournal.com/for_teachers/2183